DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University (source)

As promised, another update on the progress of Romance 1. Almost 1/3 through the year, and I’m still doing my hour a week – sometimes late Sunday night, but it’s getting done. Earlier this week I passed 14,000 words, which is still not the 20,000 of an earlier version, but these are better words, if I do say so myself. The early chapters are underwritten, so on revision it will be longer.

I am sticking to my outline for the timeline and most events, but fixing secondary character and setting issues as required. For example, my hero is engaged (to the wrong woman), and I had him receiving demanding phone calls from her, as well as his demanding boss. This was getting redundant, and I was having problems justifying why he ends the engagement, and quits his job. The solution was to make his girlfriend and his boss the same character. That solved both the redundancy and the motivation problems.

For this week’s chapter, I had to decide if my heroine and hero go to bed. It didn’t make any difference to the heat level, as I was not planning to write a sex scene if they did. Whether or not they went to bed was important – the mechanics of what they did, if they did, were not. The choice was between some heavy kissing in the hall, and then they go into her room, or some heavy kissing in the hall, and then they go to their separate rooms. They went into her room.

The first consideration was whether or not going to bed together would be in character for them. For her, yes. In a minor act of rebellion against too many heroines, even in contemporary romances, that lead sheltered sex lives while their lovers have enjoyed many casual flings, my heroine has had her fair share of fun. For him, yes, primarily because it’s a chance to throw plot rocks at him. He’s engaged, and starting to think he’s made a mistake. He has, but after going to bed with her, he feels guilty, which is going to push him back to the wrong woman and make the Happy Ever After harder to resolve.

The second consideration was how going to bed together might affect the plot. The next morning, she finds out that he lied about who he was, what he was doing, and that he was engaged. It’s a major betrayal of trust, but it’s so much worse if they’ve just slept together. I couldn’t resist the temptation to heighten the betrayal.

By the way, if you are wondering why he’s in her house in the first place, his truck was destroyed when the road washed out (and trapped them together).  I may be having too much fun with this….nah. No such thing. Hopefully it will be fun read, too.

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