Why I Respect E. L. James

I have not read Fifty Shades of Grey. I know something of the story (submissive relationship) and something of the writing (poor), and I've no desire to read it. It's no secret that the story and writing are widely mocked, which leaves me mystified as to why anyone thought a twitter Q & A with …

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Is it Hot in Here?

I rarely mention that I am working on a romance novel. Apart from not wanting to overdo the self-promotion, staying quiet about it keeps the writing pressure off. I abandoned the first draft a few years ago, and the much improved second draft outline is moving slowly. One of the challenges is the correct level …

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The Race of the Book

In the early 1700s, Alexander Pope wrote "The Rape of the Lock." This poem is a mock-heroic portrayal of an incident between a couple of aristocrats: Robert Petre, 7th Baron Petre, around twenty at the time, cut off a lock of hair belonging to Arabella Fermor. She was offended (and rightly so), the families quarreled, and an acquaintance prevailed upon …

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Off the Clock / In the Line of Duty

Off the Clock and In the Line of Duty are romance novellas by Donna Alward. They were originally distributed as eBooks and later printed together as First Responders Volume 1.  They, and others in the series, are available at http://www.samhainpublishing.com/author/7/donna-alward. I've read and enjoyed several of Alward's Harlequin books: Sleigh Ride with the Rancher, A Family for the …

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A Match for Sister Maggy

A Match for Sister Maggy is another Betty Neels book, which means another poor English nurse meets a rich Dutch doctor and has a chaste romance. This one, from 1979, is older than A Girl Named Rose, but slightly less dated and slightly less contrived. It's also been sold as A Nurse in Holland and Amazon …

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The Midwife

Carolyn Davidson's The Midwife, from 1999, is a Harlequin historical western. It's 1892, and widow Leah Gunderson, almost thirty, is living in the small Minnesota town of her childhood. She takes in laundry, and does a little health care, having learned medical skills growing up with her single mother. Money is tight, and while there …

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The Matchmaker Trilogy – Jane Feather

Jane Feather has written more than fifty romance novels, most of them trilogies, and she works outside of the Harlequin juggernaut. I'm reviewing: The Bachelor List The Bride Hunt The Wedding Game The first two are available in a 2-in-1 edition, which I found in the break room at work. I was sufficiently hooked by …

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A Most Unconventional Match

I started A Most Unconventional Match (Julia Justiss, 2008) with low expectations. Maybe I'm getting fussy in my old age, or maybe I just have a better idea of what I want. I've found historicals can be hit and miss, and Regency novels tend to focus on what the kids call "first world problems," which …

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